Anne Lynam Goddard, CEO & President, ChildFund International

by Diana Quick / CEO Forum

Anne Goddard Zambia webAnne Lynam Goddard has been a passionate voice for protecting the world’s most vulnerable children for more than 30 years.

She began her career in the Peace Corps, living in a mud house in Kenya and traveling among remote villages by motorbike. After earning a master’s degree in public health from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, she joined the international huma
nitarian organization CARE and lived and worked overseas for almost 20 years, serving in a variety of roles in Somalia, Bangladesh, Indonesia and Egypt.

In 2007, Anne joined ChildFund International (USA) as president and CEO. At ChildFund, she has drawn on her personal experiences to direct the organization’s efforts to promote child protection strategies around the world, raising awareness of the threats to children’s ability to find opportunity, hope and self-sufficiency. Building on the organization’s nearly 80-year history, she has also implemented a strategy that expands and deepens ChildFund’s worldwide efforts to improve children’s health, education and economic conditions.

Anne is active in her own community and in other nonprofit organizations. She is currently a board member of the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition and InterAction, a member of the federal Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid, and serves on the executive advisory committee for the University of Richmond’s Robins School of Business. In 2009, Goddard received an honorary Ph.D. from Assumption College (Mass.).

ChildFund International and Christian Children’s Fund of Canada launch joint drought response in Ethiopia

by ChildFund International & Christian Children's Fund of Canada / Reports

The failure of two rainy seasons in Ethiopia has put the lives and livelihoods of millions of people in the country’s southern and eastern lowland areas at risk. ChildFund International and Christian Children’s Fund of Canada are combining their efforts to address the impact of the current drought on the lives and livelihoods of drought-affected people.

International Aid Towards Ending Violence Against Children Deeply Lacking, First-Ever Study Shows

by ChildFund International / Statements

Richmond, Va. (June 08, 2017) – Out of every dollar the world spends on development assistance, only half a penny supports efforts to end violence against children, according to a new study, Counting Pennies. Commissioned by ChildFund Alliance and others, the study evaluates official development assistance (ODA) — government aid to promote the economic development and welfare of developing countries — targeted towards preventing and responding to violence against children.

On the Migrants’ Trail (Part One): In Search of a New Life

by Julien Anseau, Global Communications Manager, ChildFund International / Blog

Julien, who has worked with ChildFund in Asia and specialises in emergency communications, joined our assessment team as they travelled through Turkey, Greece, Macedonia and Serbia earlier this year, documenting the needs of migrants and asylum seekers from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, particularly children and youth. This is the first of Julien’s reports from the field.

Thousands of Afghans, Iraqis and Syrians are fleeing their war-torn countries and embarking on a perilous journey to Europe seeking refuge and a better life. In Izmir, a western port city of more than 2 million people in Turkey, many throng the streets, desperate to get to Greece — the entrance to the European Union.

On the Migrants’ Trail (Part Three): Reaching Serbia

by Julien Anseau, Global Communications Manager, ChildFund International / Blog

At least four trains arrive daily in Tabanovce, a Macedonian refugee camp near the Serbian border. But when we arrive, it’s deserted. The place feels eerie and empty, showing the transient nature of migrant camps.

Most migrants coming through here arrived from Greece, their landing point in Europe; they pass through Macedonia to Serbia and then, if they’re fortunate, on to Germany and other western European countries. Others take a route through north-western Turkey, Bulgaria and Serbia. Both roads are well known to smugglers, who often make the journeys possible — at a steep cost.

On the Migrants’ Trail (Part Two): Children Traveling Without Parents

by Julien Anseau, Global Communications Manager, ChildFund International / Blog

Since the events described here, in the past week violence has broken out in Idomeni, Greece, because of a bottleneck caused by Macedonia’s new daily cap on the number of migrants allowed into the country, as well as other restrictions. Thousands are now stranded in Idomeni and nearby camps, causing serious tension and questions about what will happen next.

There are significant economic benefits for developing nations by sending children to school instead of work

by Vikram Chaudhary, Financial Express / In the News

Even after 70 years of independence, we haven’t been able to send all our children to school. Worse still, there are crores [tens of millions] of child labourers in India, and their number is increasing in sectors such as agriculture, mining and domestic labour. “The root causes of child labour are poverty, illiteracy, lack of quality education and resources, and poor implementation of laws,” says Neelam Makhijani, country director & CEO of ChildFund India—a child development organisation. In an interview with FE’s Vikram Chaudhary, she argues that child labour and poverty go hand in hand, and suggests some reform measures that can, over time, eradicate this social evil.